Depression Screening

Within the next three years, the anticipated leading cause of disability and the second contributor to global burden of disease, surprisingly, is depression.  Only heart disease surpasses depression in devastation when considering the number of years lost to disability or in extreme cases: death. Statistics show that primary care physicians treat over 50 percent of their patients for mental health issues and unfortunately, many times, depression issues are not accurately diagnosed or missed entirely.  Given this information, depression screenings provide a necessary component to on-going, successful healthcare.

Depression screenings need not cause added anxiety or stress.  In most cases, the screening for depression includes questions that have to do with daily activities in regard to energy level, eating habits or your ability to concentrate.  Usually, the screenings ask you to number how often these issues occur, to take note of any patterns or developing issues.  After patients undergo an initial screening for depression, then clinical experts are more able to determine an accurate diagnosis for depression to decide what appropriate treatment, if any, is needed.

Oftentimes, people want to disregard the signs and symptoms of depression as a short-term bad mood or a troubled situation in which they happen to find themselves for the moment.  In reality, depression screenings can help people understand the difficulty of mental illness and its significant consequences, as well as the varying ways depression attacks individuals.  Knowing that depression is treatable and that you are not alone can reassure people.  If nothing else, encouraging yourself or someone else to take a depression screening test may help save a life.

Depression screenings can be the key to a turning point in your life or someone you love.  Don’t hesitate to ask your medical professional for more information about depression screenings and how to determine if symptoms require further medical examination.

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Sources:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1071624/
https://adaa.org/iving-with-anxiety/ask-and-learn/screenings/screening-depression
https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/depression-what-you-need-to-know/index.shtml